Wastewater Task Force

On December 23rd, 2009, a Wastewater Treatment Task Force group was assembled by assignment of the CRWD Board of Managers to determine what wastewater treatment method or methods will best serve the citizens of the CRWD. The Task Force's recommendations and findings were accepted by the Board of Managers at their regular meeting on July 14th, 2010. The recommendations of the Task Force are listed below, and can be found in Section 10 of the CRWD Watershed Management Plan.


Task Force Findings are as follows:

  1. No Single Method Proposed – The Task Force finds that no single method of wastewater treatment would best serve the citizens of the CRWD at this time.
  2. Need to Increase Systems Awareness – In favoring no single method of wastewater treatment, the Task Force finds that the multiple methods of wastewater treatment currently serving the interests of citizens of the District reflect a need to increase property owner knowledge about the evaluation, maintenance, and upgrading options for improving their wastewater treatment systems.
  3. Need to Stimulate Citizen Action – The Task Force finds that, while excellent information about property owner evaluation, maintenance and improvement options for wastewater treatment has been developed by the University of Minnesota Extension Service and other agencies of government, the awareness and utilization of such information by citizens needs to be stimulated, in cooperation with Counties, Townships, lake associations, and industry professionals in the District.
  4. CRWD Serving Citizen Interests – The Task Force finds that by stimulating property owner initiated action to evaluate and explore their wastewater treatment improvement options, individually or collectively, the District will serve the economic interests of its citizens, while advancing its water quality objectives for the lakes, streams, and rivers in the District.
  5. Need for Long Term External Evaluation – The Task Force finds that, while Counties in the District provide for mandatory individual wastewater system inspection and certification under specified conditions (such as when a building permit is issued or when a property is sold), such regulations providing for an exemption from certification when the property is sold to a family member or a trust may unreasonably perpetuate noncompliant systems to the degree that such "grandfather clause" exemptions may not be in the public interest.

Therefore, the Task Force recommends the following actions be taken by the CRWD:

  1. Self Evaluation - The Task Force recommends that the CRWD - in consultation with the Counties of Wright, Stearns, Meeker, and District townships, lake associations, and wastewater treatment industry professionals – promote the development and implementation of a District-wide property owner information program to stimulate citizen awareness and action aimed at maintaining compliant wastewater systems through voluntary self evaluation, maintenance, and upgrading initiatives.
  2. Certification upon title transfer to family members – The Task Force recommends that the CRWD, in consultation with the Counties of Wright, Stearns, and Meeker, propose that regulations be modified to eliminate existing exemptions from the inspection and certification of individual wastewater systems when a property is sold or transferred to a family member, so that such systems would be required to meet current standards.
  3. Certification upon title transfer to trusts – The Task Force recommends that the CRWD, in consultation with the Counties of Wright, Stearns, and Meeker, propose that regulations be modified to eliminate existing exemptions from the inspection and certification of individual wastewater systems when a property is sold or transferred to a trust, so that such systems would be certified as meeting the current standards.
  4. Certification of all systems – The Task Force recommends that the CRWD, in consultation with the Counties of Wright, Stearns, and Meeker, propose that regulations be modified to require inspection and certification of all individual wastewater treatment systems at least every thirty years, so that all systems would be required to meet the then current standards when they have not otherwise been certified for a period of thirty years or more.